In Mijas, you can find several hermitages that hold historical significance and are located in the area of Mijas Pueblo. These hermitages trace their origins to the early days of Christianity when the first hermits lived in secluded places, away from social life. Initially, these locations were caves or shelters on the outskirts of cities, where hermits withdrew for prayer and meditation. The development of hermitages as religious structures occurred after the Council of Trent, which took place in Italy between 1545 and 1563. During this council, certain popular practices related to the devotion to saints and the worship of the Virgin were confirmed, leading to the practical construction of numerous hermitages and shrines.

In Mijas, based on the available documentation, the construction of hermitages likely began a century later. They were built on the outskirts of the population, which, at that time, was limited to the area around La Muralla and situated along the roads leading to Málaga, Fuengirola, and Coín. Many of these hermitages have now been integrated into the village due to urban expansion. Here are the most prominent hermitages in Mijas.

Santuario de la Virgen de la Peña Hermitage

This hermitage in Mijas Pueblo is unique, serving as a sanctuary carved into a rock that possibly held remnants of an ancient fortified structure. It houses the image of the Virgen de la Peña, the Patroness of Mijas, in an irregular niche. Located near the old path to Fuengirola, known as the path of Fuente de la Seda, its excavation is attributed to the Carmelite Diego de Jesús, María, and San Pablo in the second half of the 17th century, with a sacristy and an entrance simulating a natural cave. Until the mid-19th century, it was cared for by the barefoot Carmelite monks, who built an adjoining convent and called it Virgen del Carmen for many years.

Virgen de la Peña Hermitage

Nuestra Señora de los Remedios Hermitage

Located in the Santa Ana neighborhood of Mijas, the Ermita de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios was likely built in the late 17th century along the path to Coín. After urban expansion, it became integrated into the population. The structure is simple, with a single rectangular nave, a pitched wooden roof, a chapel with a ribbed vault in the presbytery, and decorative plasterwork. The altar features three niches with an ancient carving of the Virgin of the Remedies. The entrance is a round arch framed by pilasters, opening towards Plaza de los Siete Caños.

Nuestra Señora de los Remedios Hermitage

San Sebastián Hermitage

Located next to the Camino de Málaga (current Calle Málaga), this hermitage has been in existence since at least 1637 and has undergone various reforms over time.

With a single nave covered by a wooden truss, it features a square presbytery with a semi-spherical vault decorated with floral motifs. The main chapel is square, with a semi-spherical vault over pendentives adorned with plasterwork and cut-out plates. In the main altar, there is a shrine with a ribbed vault and frescoes of angels painted in the 18th century.

The facade stands out with its round arch entrance between pilasters, entablature, and split pediment, topped by a belfry with a single opening. On the facade, there is a clock installed in 1902 that cost just over 2,000 pesetas at that time.

San Sebastián Hermitage

San Antón Hermitage

Located near the Old Road to Málaga, this hermitage was built after 1773, as it does not appear in a list of churches and hermitages of Mijas from that date. According to the Bishopric of Málaga, it was constructed in the 18th century. With a single nave covered with a wooden truss and a chapel separated by a lowered arch, its facade is simple, featuring a round arch framed by pilasters and topped by a belfry. Every year on January 17th, the pilgrimage of San Antón is celebrated here.

San Antón Hermitage

Puerto Hermitage

Constructed between 1875 and 1876 along the old Camino de Málaga, the Ermita del Puerto was funded by donations from the faithful and was originally named Ermita del Señor de la Buenamuerte, a name that was later changed. It features a simple rectangular structure and is currently elevated above the road due to excavations that altered its original level in the 19th century.

Puerto Hermitage

Calvario Hermitage

Like the Ermita de San Antón, it does not appear in the 1773 registry, suggesting it was built after that date, although there are no documents confirming this. The building has a single nave, a barrel-vaulted roof, a flat head, and three recessed niches, with the central one being the largest.

Located at the foot of the mountain, access is through a path among the pine trees marked with crosses (Via Crucis). It is said that the Carmelite monks who guarded the Ermita de la Virgen de la Peña used it as a spiritual retreat. The hermitage only opens its doors on Fridays during Lent.

Ermita del Calvario
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